April 10, 2015 Coffee & Company

Starbucks Named One of the Top 10 Places to Work in Canada

For the fifth-consecutive year, Starbucks is named one of the “Best Workplaces in Canada," based on employee feedback and research compiled by an independent firm that evaluates workplace culture.

At number nine, Starbucks Canada is the highest ranking publicly-traded retailer on the list of top 50 large and multinational companies. That is up from 2014, when Starbucks ranked 17th.  Google is the number one large employer, followed by AOL, Autodesk, NetApp, and Intuit finishing in the top five. 

“For me, being an employer of choice comes to life with the priority Starbucks places on developing our partners (employees),” said Lisa Essinger, who started as a barista in one of the company’s first stores in Victoria, BC and now is a director of Starbucks licensed store operations for Canada. “A consistent theme in my 20 years is how committed all of my leaders have been in investing in the development of all our partners.”

Kathleen Cook, a brand manager for Starbucks Coffee Canada, recently celebrated her 19th anniversary with the company.

“Starbucks mission and values have our partners, customers and coffee at the core, which guides all of our decisions and actions,” Cook said. “I have a passion for people and coffee, and being able to combine these every day makes me very fortunate.”

Great Places to Work® compiles the annual list of Best Workplaces using a survey tool called the Trust Index®. This is part of the world's largest annual workplace study, which culminates in a series of national lists in almost 50 countries, including the study's flagship list of 100 Best companies published annually in Fortune magazine. Globally, the survey represents the voices of 11 million employees.

The primary determinant used in selecting winners is an employee survey. Two-thirds of a company's score comes from a 59-statement survey completed by a random selection of employees. The remaining one-third of the score is determined by an in-depth review of the organization’s culture, including an evaluation of human resources policies and procedures. The Institute says its research provides data on five trust-building dimensions of company culture - credibility, respect, fairness, pride, and camaraderie.

"While there is no single right way to create a great workplace," the Great Places to Work® Institute acknowledged. "The very best companies have managed to create a culture where employees trust the people they work for, have pride in what they do, and enjoy the people they work with."

Starbucks has about 16,000 partners in Canada.


For more information on this story, contact the Starbucks Newsroom